Horror

TGoF’s 2018 Halloween Binge: Jigsaw

jigsaw_posterWhat’s on tap?

Day 4 of the daily genre consumption inspired me to search the depths of Hulu since I’ve spread the love of Netflix and Shudder. However, the search somehow stalled at me finally decided to check out the latest in the murderous legacy the Saw franchise known as 2017’s Jigsaw.

What an unfortunate choice it was. The series has always been a grim exercise in waning morality, but the silver lining being that at least there were some pretty cool traps on display. In Jigsaw, it’s just more of the same. Murder, justified in a twisted sense of moral justice with a half-baked mystery at its center.

I’m not sure what I wanted or even expected with the latest sequel, but in a perfect world as the credits rolled I foolishly hoped that maybe this will be the end. The film certainly does not conclude taking my wishes into account, but perhaps it’s overall perception will spell the demise of this franchise which has been in steady decline ever since Saw II. (more…)

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TGoF’s 2018 Halloween Binge: Ruin Me

ruinme_posterWhat’s on tap?

Day 3 of my October quest to consume at least one new piece of horror media a day brought me back to Shudder’s deep well of personally undiscovered titles and I came up with one of their Exclusives, Ruin Me.

Ideally the goal of this whole month will be to sometimes randomly pick titles and be pleasantly surprised to genuinely thrilled to find something great that I would not have expected. While with Hitchcock’s Rope there wasn’t much risk in turning up a dud, there’s always a risk for unproven talents and titles sitting out there waiting to be watched. While Ruin Me is certainly not a full on dud, it also was not the undiscovered gem I was hoping it could be.

Using the staging piece of the ever popular escape rooms/extreme haunts there’s a semblance of a solid idea at Ruin Me’s core. Placing a bunch of strangers to work together to solve a puzzle but maybe the experience is more real than what they signed up for. (more…)

TGoF’s 2018 Halloween Binge: Cargo

cargoposterWhat’s on tap?

October is the perfect time to sit back and take in some spooky cinema. Each day leading up to Halloween I plan to sit down and watch at least one spooky flick or TV episode and report back daily with some brief thoughts on the media.

On the docket for October 1, 2018 (sorry, didn’t decide to do this and finish the first flick until zero hour) is Netflix’s original film, Cargo. Starring the always charming Martin Freeman as a dad, Andy, wandering the Australian Outback during an unexplained apocalypse that’s left zombies, some with their heads buried in the ground, others shambling around doing what they do best–takin’ a bite out of the living. This epidemic leaves the infected victim with 48 hours before they turn and with a young child, Rosie, to worry about Andy desperately searches for someone who can take care of his daughter before it’s too late. (more…)

The Definitive TGoF Recap of the 2018 Fantasia Film Festival

What’s on tap for today?

I look forward to the Fantasia Film Festival each year for a variety of reasons. One, you get to take in a wide array of genre titles, many of which may or may not find their way to a broader audience. Two, it’s one of the few festivals that caters to the film blogger with a jam packed lifestyle and makes a number of the titles available for remote coverage.

While I hope to one day actually be able to escape to the Montreal fest in person someday it’s equally as busy on the home front balancing work and home life while trying to fit in some weird flicks in the interim. As a family man with a full-time job it’s not a walk in the park finding the free time to watch insane genre movies and then sitting down to write about them–as much as I wish I was the guy who was getting paid for people to disagree about movies with on a daily basis. So, while my Fantasia intake is a fraction of your typical writer who attends the fest, here’s a rundown of some of titles I caught that hopefully everyone will be able to take a gander at sooner rather than later.

Bodied

bodied_posterHollywood has yet to see the value in the chaotic brain belonging to director Joseph Kahn. His work has been ridiculed and praised in equal parts for his cinematic efforts Torque and Detention. The frequent music video director may have really hit his stride though with Bodied, a battle rap comedy and drama that, if there is any justice in his world, will see Kahn finally breaking through into the mainstream of film culture.

The straight pitch for Bodied (a term I had no knowledge of prior to this film’s existence) is essentially what if 8 Mile were about a privileged white kid studying battle rap as an art form and became a heavyweight in the medium in the process. Also, if the climatic battle rap of 8 Mile were stretched into 2 hours. Calum Worthy stars as Adam, the aforementioned privileged white Ivy League geek who attends a battle rap session to interview Behn Grymm (Jackie Long) and get the 411 about the use of the “N word” in and out of the battle rap context. When asked to put his battle rap knowledge to the test Adam impressed, finding his star thrust to the big leagues of the battle rap circles. The higher his star rises, the more he loses his grip on what’s acceptable in and out of the confines of a battle rap stage.

There’s a double edged sword slicing its way throughout the course of Bodied and its the character of Adam as a whole. Joseph Kahn as director and working from a script he co-wrote with Alex Larsen allows the audience to experience what it’s like to completely flip their opinion on Adam left and right. At first he seems like a well meaning–if somewhat intellectually obnoxious–scholar obsessed with a culture that he more or less doesn’t belong in. Eventually he transforms into a completely obnoxious, homophobic, and racist scholar, but the complex part is deciding if Adam IS all of those things, or if he just loses himself in the art and culture that he’s co-opted.

Once you can stomach the ups and downs of watching Adam spit fart smelly intellectual musings about cultural appropriation and race relationships then rap poetically about various racist stereotypes, misogyny, and homophobia then you’re well on your way to connecting with Kahn’s overall vision. The filmmaker flip-flops around from straight up comedy to dramatic beats in a natural way without alienating the overall satire.

The performances are fantastic, combined with a number of impressive battle rap scenes that you’ll have to watch over and over again to catch the rapid fire jokes and insults being hurled around. Bodied is a whirlwind of cringe-inducing slams and genius level satire that has to be seen over and over again to be believed.

Rating: A-

I’ve covered the films below in one centralized location, so as opposed to regurgitating my thoughts, I’ll give you a brief overview of my overall thoughts and provide a handy dandy link to the full review.

CAM

If you are jonesin for a full length film that feels like a Black Mirror episode, then look no further than CAM. There’s a reason why this film was given the honor of as the best first feature and best screenplay at the 2018 Fantasia Film Festival. Plus, a brace and committed performance by Madeline Brewer make this a flick to put on your radar and check out as soon as you can.

Full Review: Coming Soon

Pledge

The horror of pledging a frat or sorority is not lost on those who have likely done so or are considering doing so. However, if you find yourself in a dark room with a bunch of psychos who want to brand you as the FIRST step of their initiation, you’ll do well to walk out the door ASAP, cause things won’t get much better from there.

Full Review: Pledge (Bloody Good Horror)

The Man Who Killed Hitler and Then The Bigfoot

Word of advice, don’t EVER make your decision to see a movie based on the title alone. Not that The Man Who Killed Hitler and Then The Bigfoot is a bad movie, but boy howdy is it a whoooole lot different from the movie I was expecting. A great, but subdued performance from Sam Elliot is the anchoring piece for this one that should probably be added to your list, once your expectations are adequately realigned.

Full Review: The Man Who Killed Hitler and Then The Bigfoot (Bloody Good Horror)

Cold Skin

Xavier Gens’ career in the genre is unique if nothing else. However, the potential in all of his films to this date has yet to really hit a peak leaving a lot on the table, which can only keep you employed for so long before people get hip to your tricks.

Full Review: Cold Skin (Bloody Good Horror)

Knuckleball

You like Home Alone right? Of course, who doesn’t. What if I told you there’s a version of Home Alone for genre fans that answers the question if Harry and Marv were one person and had a thing for little boys that didn’t involve just robbing their famiy? Well, this is that movie….for the most part.

Full Review: Knuckleball (Bloody Good Horror)

Hurt

No, sorry Nine Inch Nails fans, this is NOT a full length feature based on the popular song once famously covered by Johnny Cash. It is however, an ALMOST pretty good kind of stalk and slash flick that tries way too hard to pull the rug out from under the audience with annoying misdirections. Of note, after this movie was screened/reviewed it was brought to my attention that the screened copy was not the final version, so take the review with a grain of salt as there’s currently no way to know if the new cut may have alleviated some of my issues.

Full Review: Hurt (Bloody Good Horror)

The Witch in the Window

Hindsight is a weird thing. After reviewing this film I’ve gone back and read some reactions and additional reviews to see what some of fellow writers had to say about this one and apparently I’m in the minority. Personally, I found this little slice of Canadian ghost nonsense to be a quite dull but also a supremely effective sleep aid.

Full Review: The Witch in the Window (Bloody Good Horror)

Lifechanger

One of the cool things about Fantasia is coming across films having no idea what you’re in for. Lifechanger features a fascinating concept that spends a little bit too much time info dumping in clunky ways instead of focusing on the engaging bits of serial killer body horror that its concept has the audience begging for. Still, despite its missteps its definitely worth checking out.

Full Review: Lifechanger (Bloody Good Horror)

Overall, of the movies I was able to catch, this year’s fest didn’t yield the same number of hidden gems that the previous year’s did, although it did give me two titles that will be vying for spots on my top 10 lists of the year.

Best Overall: Bodied (A-)
Best Genre Flick: CAM  (B+)

Over the course of the three week festival I also took in screenings of films from the festival that were supplied to me separate from the inclusion of festival coverage that I will be sharing reviews of very soon that include The Ranger, ArizonaPuppet Master: The Littlest Reich and Summer of ’84–so stay tuned!

Leave No Trace at The Devil’s Doorway.

What’s on tap for today?

Happy Friday the 13th! In honor of the day I was able to take in a couple of screenings for some smaller movies–not related to The Rock punching a building or Adam Sandler sucking in ways unrelated to his non-animated work–that you should be able to take a gander at beginning, well today (7/13/18). Leave No Trace stars the ever talented Ben Foster as a tortured vet who prefers living off-the-grid with his daughter until their all natural life is uprooted and they are forced to integrate back into society. Then, we’ll dip into the volatile world of found footage horror with The Devil’s Doorway, a scathing exploration of religion that dives into dark recesses of hell and the mysterious supernatural–good times were had by all. PS….children doing weird sh*t in the dark is never not scary.

Leave No Trace

leavenotrace_posterGenerally, when you consider the idea of a homeless individual one’s natural instinct is to assume that this is an individual with no means to secure a roof over their head. It’s not unreasonable to assume very few have ever considered the idea that the people they’ve encountered and assumed were homeless are choosing to live that way–and–if you choose to live out in the open, are you really homeless?

Such is the case with Debra Granik’s latest picture, Leave No Trace, which finds Will (Ben Foster) and his daughter Tom (Thomasin McKenzie) living out in the woods surrounding Portland, Oregon. Not struggling to survive, not out on the streets begging for money or shelter, but living off the land with the supplies they have–and buying goods from selling expired meds that Will was once given to ward off his PTSD. However, despite how carefully Will trained his daughter to be in the lookout for people roaming the woods they are plucked from their nook and forced back into society to try to assimilate back as productive normal on-the-grid schmucks. This proves to be too much for the tortured Will to bare and his insistence to go back to normal becomes the wedge that may drive he and Tom apart now that she’s gotten a taste of what it’s like to be a part of a normal society. (more…)

F-F-F-Fantasia Film Festival 2018 and its 17 Most Intriguing Titles TGoF Can’t Wait to See!

What’s on tap for today?

Friday July 13, 2018 marks the official kickoff of the Fantasia Film Festival which ends on August 2, 2018. I’ve been fortunate enough to cover the films featured in the Montreal festival for the last four years and like each year before it the titles just keep getting more and more interesting. Last year I was able to take in titles that ended up being some of my favorite genre offerings of the year (Tragedy Girls and Better Watch Out). So before we press start on this year’s insanity, lets take a look at some of the titles I’m most looking forward to (hopefully) deliver some reviews for as the fest gets under way! Why 17? I dunno, cause it’s not the standard 10 and its an odd number which just seemed like the right thing to do. Also, I miscounted when I did all the write-ups (since I lumped 3 into one paragraph) and didn’t feel like taking two of them off the list–sooo yeah.

Anna and the Apocalypse

Say zombies and you have my attention–then hit me with musical and I start to pull back a bit. However, the buzz for this one out of Sundance is hard to ignore. Plus it’s a horror christmas movie which always excites me. So paint me optimistic with a touch a caution as we await to see if this is a cult classic in the making and not just the classic tune of festival hype.

annaapocalypse_img

Arizona

(more…)

The Family That Cults Together, Stays Together.

What’s on tap for today?

Did I miss the memo? Is being involved in some weird occult/cult shenanigans all the rage now? The Endless, Pyewacket, and now Hereditary are riding high in many critical circles and each have their own little twist on the taboo. So, if spreading funky juju all over my essence is now the in thing then apparently my Saturday night is all booked up. Oh yeah, and this tiny little indie movie came out this weekend, Incredibles 2, maybe you’ve heard of it. I don’t think I need to explain why these two movies are different, but they’re similar only for the fact that they have to deal with the complexities of family. Also, one has way fewer beheadings than the other–let’s find out which one, shall we?

Hereditary

A couple weeks have passed since I first screened Hereditary and there is one thing I can say for certain–not a day has passed that I haven’t thought about it. Granted a lot of it was people asking me what I though and if it was as amazing and scary as the ads and critics had said it was. Putting it right out there, as I walked out of the theater I was extremely conflicted and two weeks later not much else as changed. I’m still of the mind that I like this movie, and the one thing I’m fairly certain about is that it’s absolutely not the horror juggernaut that the marketing has billed it as. In fact, unless you don’t regularly watch horror movies it’s not all that scary. It’s unsettling and there’s lots of disturbing visuals, but I never once worried about sleeping at night–and neither should you. (more…)

The Endless Quiet of Infinity

What’s on tap for today?

Not gonna waste any time, since it’s been a bit since I’ve last checked in. I’ve got 3 reviews of vastly different movies with one of them being about a decade in the making. So strap in and enjoy!

The Endless

theendless_posterEvery indie director has that moment where their constant struggle to break into the mainstream or to just be gifted with the means to make a film without it feeling like pulling teeth in regards to time, budget and studio cooperation, hits its peak. From there the powers that be finally recognize the talent and make things happen for these filmmakers. If there is any cinematic justice in this world then The Endless is that moment for Justin Benson and Aaron Moorhead.

Blessed by a tremendous marketing campaign including a series of jaw dropping posters, The Endless is a special kind of mind warping weirdness that simply has to be seen if you’re even a fringe genre fanatic. Of course there’s no guarantee you’ll love it as deeply and enthusiastically as this reviewer, but for the sheer ambition of it all, Benson and Moorhead are owed your attention.

Starring the filmmakers themselves as brothers returning to a cult they escaped a decade earlier for a day long visit they find themselves confronted with the possibility that their memory of the compound and the beliefs of the members may not be as crazy as they once thought. (more…)

Annihilation And It Feels So Good + Game Night, Toppling Goliath Can Designs & Omaha Film Festival Kickoff Week

What’s on tap for today?

theendless_posterThe flu is the pits. Like anyone in the history of ever has ever really needed to justify that sentence. Yes, the flu and various other illnesses/concerns kept me down and out over the last couple of weeks hindering my ability (eh, at least my desire) to be productive. This in turn has assured that I would fall behind on a couple of movie reviews which got kicked down far enough to combine a number of goings on in the world of this busy dad.

Today’s update will take us through reviews of Alex Garland’s stellar sci-fi drama Annihilation and the surprisingly hilarious thrills of Game Night. After that I’ll dabble into the ever changing landscape of Toppling Goliath Brewing Company’s canned beers–including their badass can designs–before capping the post off to express the excitement behind what will be my first appearance at an Omaha Film Festival event as the fest kicks off this week. Let’s dig in, shall we? (more…)

[Movie Reviews/Blog Update] Behold, Victor Crowley’s Psychotic Winchester Cloverfield Paradox

1517860057122You may begin to notice a few changes in the coming weeks/months here at Tall Glass of Film. The first will be a name change forthcoming. The changes coming are part of my attempt to mediate time spent doing one of my favorite things (writing) by including all relevant aspects of it into the medium. I’m a dad who loves movies, beer, the Chicago Cubs and writing. So I’m the future this blog will have a combination of those things integrated into the posts.

You might get straightforward movie reviews and beer reviews, but also life updates as being a dad with a now 2-year old daughter. This may include the highs and lows of being a dad, funny stories, sad stories, and just random musings as the mood to write strikes. So no don’t expect your typical parenting blog or a one-dimensional review blog from here on how. The goal is to expand a bit and in the process entertain in word form.

So to begin a slow transition, here’s a quadruple dose of short movie reviews! Note: Haven’t decided if the ratings are gonna stick around or not. So if you like or dislike them, lemme know. I can use any and all feedback based on what anyone stumbling across this likes to see. 

Victor Crowley

victorcrowley_posterAdam Green is a director with a clear passion for the genre he works in almost exclusively. That passion doesn’t always translate successfully, but it’s evident in how he talks about it on his and Joe Lynch’s podcast, “The Movie Crypt”, and it’s evident in the visual presentation of his movies. It’s the content that sometimes falls flat–particularly within the Hatchet franchise.

Victor Crowley sees Green returning to the swamp that essentially launched his career and more so than ever before it feels like he’s having a blast delivering the gory goods. Picking up a decade after the events of the first film, Andrew (Perry Shen), is a ostracized survivor often accused of the murders that were perpetrated by Victor Crowley. While making the rounds with his book telling his side of what happened in that Louisiana swamp he’s lured back by the promise of a massive pay-day if he gives an interview at the site of the murders. To his dismay the plane carrying him and a small crew crashes in the swamp trapping them inside, meanwhile a group a filmmakers mistakenly resurrects Cowley who picks up where he left off…dismembering anyone who is unlucky enough to cross his path.

Crowley is the modern horror icon who never met a body part he couldn’t mangle in one way or another. Green continues the bloodletting once again, allowing Crowley (reprised by the lumbering genre vet Kane Hodder) to scalp, rip off limbs, stomp skulls and generally eviscerate the flesh of any living person he encounters. Blood geysers and jelly filled prosthetics dominate each frame as Green seeks to not reinvent the wheel here, but instead just guide it back on track after a pair of poorly received sequels.

If we’re being honest with ourselves, no one flips on a movie Victor Crowley to be moved by the performances or marvel at its creative wit–this is all about the blood and guts and Green delivers all the audience can handle. Combined with a sinister yet playful sense of humor, Victor Crowley propels and hacks its way to the top of what this franchise has to offer.

Rating: B+

Psychotic!

psychotic_posterWe’re far and away from the explosion of homage and throwbacks. In many ways, filmmakers trying their hand at resurrecting the glory days of 70’s and 80’s schlockfests ends up being a transparent attempt to hide budget constraints. Every so often filmmakers can surprise with a surprising love letter to the style that transcends their original intentions. Psychotic! is not the latter. Still, Maxwell Frey and Derek Gibbons have crafted a love letter of sorts–just one that feels like it was sloppily written by a drunk teenager.

I don’t mean for that to sound overly negative. We all have fond memories of our drunk teenage days, but we hardly ever seek out that part of our history for doses of wisdom or taste. Psychotic! is essentially Halloween, if Halloween was about New York hipsters in a constant drug haze. The score is very much Halloween inspired, yet the violence and slasher carries tones of Giallo–the end result is a combo that’s enjoyable yet frustrating.

Hipsters and hipster culture is and will always be annoyingly infuriating and confusing (to someone like me), so Psychotic!’s characters are already set up for failure. Smug self-importance, disregard for normal speech and behavior patterns and irrational criticism run rampant which often are at odds with what a viewer like myself are willing to tolerate. Yet, there are moments of coherence that feel as though they were meant for a different movie entirely. A meta sense of humor and well staged (yet decidedly low-budget) effects are the film’s strong suit.

Pyschotic! is the type of movie that you can–like a true hipster–point at as having knowledge of while everyone else squints in disapproval. Having seen the film isn’t going to make you the superior movie geek to anyone you know, but it’s definitely worth a go if you accidentally stumble on it when browsing the depths of Netflix/Shudder one day.

Rating: C

Winchester

winchester_posterIf there was ever a movie that deserved to be retroactively retitled to JUMP SCARE: THE MOVIE, it’s Winchester. It’s sad to see talents like The Spierig Brothers (who helmed such fantastic films as Predestination and Daybreakers) devolve into directors for hire in studio misfires like Jigsaw and the film currently on the chopping block. Even more, it’s embarrassing to see the great Helen Mirren struggling to make any of this sound intelligent.

Mirren stars as Sarah Winchester, the heiress of the Winchester firearm fortune who is ordered to undergo a psychiatric evaluation when she orders the endless construction of her mansion. Adding on to the mansion isn’t so much the peculiar behavior so much as the design and impetus of the rooms being that they are meant to draw and trap the souls of victims at the hands of the various Winchester rifles that Sarah believes are haunting her looking for peace. However, Dr. Price (Jason Clarke) arrives to conduct his evaluation when a particularly powerful and vengeful spirit has taken residence in the mansion.

The lunacy of this story and the actual physical structure–which is a real place for those who might not be aware–is fascinating in and of itself. Winchester holds promise in that it’s attempting to bring some sort of coherence that translates to the screen, but fails at almost every turn. What left is a mass of wasted potential that takes the easy scare whenever it possibly can instead of squeezing an eerie sense of surrealism from its “fact” based story.

Winchester is a paint by numbers jump-scare-a-thon that doesn’t even bother to be playful by coloring even a fraction outside the lines. The Spierigs wastes its two leads in supremely disappointing fashion while further damaging their once creative promising careers in favor of yet another lazy studio cash grab.

Rating: D+

The Cloverfield Paradox

cloverfield3_posterBad Robot shocked us all by announcing that Cloverfield 4 (currently titled Overlord) wasn’t just part of the Cloverfieldiverse, but was finished filming and could essentially drop at any time. The only issue being that at the time, the fate of Cloverfield 3 (originally titled God Particle then rumored to be called Cloverfield Station) was still up in the air. Then the genre community collectively gasped when a trailer dropped during Super Bowl 52 indicating it was ‘Coming Very Soon’ via Netflix and was now titled The Cloverfield Paradox. Nerds took to their devices, fired up Netflix and gasped once again by the words “Available After the Game”. History was officially made. A film that no one had a clue when it was going to be released was going to be available the same night its marketing premiered.

Critics didn’t screen it beforehand (allegedly) and we would all have the ability to see this thing unfold before the hype machine got rolling. Perhaps though, this was all by design. That studio worries of a film that didn’t meet their expectations lead to multiple delays and the opportunity to manufacture a buzz through a Netflix acquisition and a “Never been done before” marketing technique would drive traffic to a film that quite simply can’t live up the insanity of its release drama.

The Cloverfield Paradox is not inherently a bad movie. However, it is a frustrating experience that borders on annoying. Annoying because it has no business being a Cloverfield movie and its attempt to shoehorn it into that universe are transparent and sloppy. From the horribly written Donal Logue exposition dump that sets the stage for the entire Cloverfield universe in general, to the obvious and eye-rolling jump scare in the closing seconds–the film’s biggest faults are that it has the audacity to carry the name Cloverfield.

God Particle is the perfect name for this movie. It wouldn’t fix some of the sloppy science that’s on display nor would it save it from some of its other flaws, but it would’ve eliminated the retroactive rage that comes with tying it unnecessarily to a franchise its script clearly didn’t originally intend. As a sci-fi thriller The Cloverfield Paradox has a fascinating arc that runs parallel to extra footage shot specifically to throw the Cloverfield references in. The antics on the space station have a gleeful insanity to them as long as you ignore the dime store science it throws at you. It’s all very light and entertaining so long as you try not to peel back too many layers.

Its ties to the Cloverfieldiverse are all bad though. I have an admiration for what they are TRYING to do, but it so clearly could have been done so much better with even just a smidge more planning and execution. Serving to bridge the gap and explain in some ways how the aliens from 10 Cloverfield Lane (sorry, but if you watched Paradox without seeing Lane I don’t feel that bad about spoiling the fact that Lane has aliens) are so different from the monster we see in 2008’s Cloverfield. Also setting the stage for a different set of supernatural surprises that could be in store for us in the upcoming Overlord.

The Cloverfield Paradox while eerily familiar is worse off due to its forced connections. If it helps to ease the transition to explain this universe and its many possibilities then I for one and happy with letting it be an unfortunate blip on an otherwise promising franchise radar that just so happens to be an okay enough sci-fi thriller on its own–which might be the real paradox here.

Rating: C+