movie review

Leave No Trace at The Devil’s Doorway.

What’s on tap for today?

Happy Friday the 13th! In honor of the day I was able to take in a couple of screenings for some smaller movies–not related to The Rock punching a building or Adam Sandler sucking in ways unrelated to his non-animated work–that you should be able to take a gander at beginning, well today (7/13/18). Leave No Trace stars the ever talented Ben Foster as a tortured vet who prefers living off-the-grid with his daughter until their all natural life is uprooted and they are forced to integrate back into society. Then, we’ll dip into the volatile world of found footage horror with The Devil’s Doorway, a scathing exploration of religion that dives into dark recesses of hell and the mysterious supernatural–good times were had by all. PS….children doing weird sh*t in the dark is never not scary.

Leave No Trace

leavenotrace_posterGenerally, when you consider the idea of a homeless individual one’s natural instinct is to assume that this is an individual with no means to secure a roof over their head. It’s not unreasonable to assume very few have ever considered the idea that the people they’ve encountered and assumed were homeless are choosing to live that way–and–if you choose to live out in the open, are you really homeless?

Such is the case with Debra Granik’s latest picture, Leave No Trace, which finds Will (Ben Foster) and his daughter Tom (Thomasin McKenzie) living out in the woods surrounding Portland, Oregon. Not struggling to survive, not out on the streets begging for money or shelter, but living off the land with the supplies they have–and buying goods from selling expired meds that Will was once given to ward off his PTSD. However, despite how carefully Will trained his daughter to be in the lookout for people roaming the woods they are plucked from their nook and forced back into society to try to assimilate back as productive normal on-the-grid schmucks. This proves to be too much for the tortured Will to bare and his insistence to go back to normal becomes the wedge that may drive he and Tom apart now that she’s gotten a taste of what it’s like to be a part of a normal society. (more…)

Advertisements

The Family That Cults Together, Stays Together.

What’s on tap for today?

Did I miss the memo? Is being involved in some weird occult/cult shenanigans all the rage now? The Endless, Pyewacket, and now Hereditary are riding high in many critical circles and each have their own little twist on the taboo. So, if spreading funky juju all over my essence is now the in thing then apparently my Saturday night is all booked up. Oh yeah, and this tiny little indie movie came out this weekend, Incredibles 2, maybe you’ve heard of it. I don’t think I need to explain why these two movies are different, but they’re similar only for the fact that they have to deal with the complexities of family. Also, one has way fewer beheadings than the other–let’s find out which one, shall we?

Hereditary

A couple weeks have passed since I first screened Hereditary and there is one thing I can say for certain–not a day has passed that I haven’t thought about it. Granted a lot of it was people asking me what I though and if it was as amazing and scary as the ads and critics had said it was. Putting it right out there, as I walked out of the theater I was extremely conflicted and two weeks later not much else as changed. I’m still of the mind that I like this movie, and the one thing I’m fairly certain about is that it’s absolutely not the horror juggernaut that the marketing has billed it as. In fact, unless you don’t regularly watch horror movies it’s not all that scary. It’s unsettling and there’s lots of disturbing visuals, but I never once worried about sleeping at night–and neither should you. (more…)

The Endless Quiet of Infinity

What’s on tap for today?

Not gonna waste any time, since it’s been a bit since I’ve last checked in. I’ve got 3 reviews of vastly different movies with one of them being about a decade in the making. So strap in and enjoy!

The Endless

theendless_posterEvery indie director has that moment where their constant struggle to break into the mainstream or to just be gifted with the means to make a film without it feeling like pulling teeth in regards to time, budget and studio cooperation, hits its peak. From there the powers that be finally recognize the talent and make things happen for these filmmakers. If there is any cinematic justice in this world then The Endless is that moment for Justin Benson and Aaron Moorhead.

Blessed by a tremendous marketing campaign including a series of jaw dropping posters, The Endless is a special kind of mind warping weirdness that simply has to be seen if you’re even a fringe genre fanatic. Of course there’s no guarantee you’ll love it as deeply and enthusiastically as this reviewer, but for the sheer ambition of it all, Benson and Moorhead are owed your attention.

Starring the filmmakers themselves as brothers returning to a cult they escaped a decade earlier for a day long visit they find themselves confronted with the possibility that their memory of the compound and the beliefs of the members may not be as crazy as they once thought. (more…)

V-Day Pics and Fifty Shades of Gettin’ Rowdy with Duckman

Note: The new changes are still in the works, while I work on getting them integrated fully below you’ll fine a taste of what I expect to be the norm for posts on this page. A mixture of life updates, movie/tv/beer reviews. 

What’s on tap for today?

DSC_2198Countless other parents before me know the endless barrage of incoherent insanity that comes with the daily life of a two year old. I’m not sure anything prepared me for a photo shoot with TWO two year olds and the resulting absurdism that enfolded. Next, the wife and I took the world’s most annoyingly consumer driven holiday and had ourselves a date night which included some sushi and a trip to the Alamo Drafthouse for a ‘Rowdy Screening’ of Fifty Shades Freed. Lastly, I revisit my childhood to recount a cartoon I’m thinking I didn’t really understand or appreciate for my age at the time…Duckman.

V-Day Pics

It’s been at least a week now since Valentine’s Day came and went stealing depressing amounts of money from the pockets of men and women alike. Forcing ourselves to buy gifts on a designated day that prove to our SOs that we love them–cause, ya know…how else would they know? Anyway, to commemorate the holiday it was decreed that we take girly girl to a studio and get her pictures taken in a super adorable dress that my wife picked out, that was also on sale (score!).  (more…)

[Movie Reviews/Blog Update] Behold, Victor Crowley’s Psychotic Winchester Cloverfield Paradox

1517860057122You may begin to notice a few changes in the coming weeks/months here at Tall Glass of Film. The first will be a name change forthcoming. The changes coming are part of my attempt to mediate time spent doing one of my favorite things (writing) by including all relevant aspects of it into the medium. I’m a dad who loves movies, beer, the Chicago Cubs and writing. So I’m the future this blog will have a combination of those things integrated into the posts.

You might get straightforward movie reviews and beer reviews, but also life updates as being a dad with a now 2-year old daughter. This may include the highs and lows of being a dad, funny stories, sad stories, and just random musings as the mood to write strikes. So no don’t expect your typical parenting blog or a one-dimensional review blog from here on how. The goal is to expand a bit and in the process entertain in word form.

So to begin a slow transition, here’s a quadruple dose of short movie reviews! Note: Haven’t decided if the ratings are gonna stick around or not. So if you like or dislike them, lemme know. I can use any and all feedback based on what anyone stumbling across this likes to see. 

Victor Crowley

victorcrowley_posterAdam Green is a director with a clear passion for the genre he works in almost exclusively. That passion doesn’t always translate successfully, but it’s evident in how he talks about it on his and Joe Lynch’s podcast, “The Movie Crypt”, and it’s evident in the visual presentation of his movies. It’s the content that sometimes falls flat–particularly within the Hatchet franchise.

Victor Crowley sees Green returning to the swamp that essentially launched his career and more so than ever before it feels like he’s having a blast delivering the gory goods. Picking up a decade after the events of the first film, Andrew (Perry Shen), is a ostracized survivor often accused of the murders that were perpetrated by Victor Crowley. While making the rounds with his book telling his side of what happened in that Louisiana swamp he’s lured back by the promise of a massive pay-day if he gives an interview at the site of the murders. To his dismay the plane carrying him and a small crew crashes in the swamp trapping them inside, meanwhile a group a filmmakers mistakenly resurrects Cowley who picks up where he left off…dismembering anyone who is unlucky enough to cross his path.

Crowley is the modern horror icon who never met a body part he couldn’t mangle in one way or another. Green continues the bloodletting once again, allowing Crowley (reprised by the lumbering genre vet Kane Hodder) to scalp, rip off limbs, stomp skulls and generally eviscerate the flesh of any living person he encounters. Blood geysers and jelly filled prosthetics dominate each frame as Green seeks to not reinvent the wheel here, but instead just guide it back on track after a pair of poorly received sequels.

If we’re being honest with ourselves, no one flips on a movie Victor Crowley to be moved by the performances or marvel at its creative wit–this is all about the blood and guts and Green delivers all the audience can handle. Combined with a sinister yet playful sense of humor, Victor Crowley propels and hacks its way to the top of what this franchise has to offer.

Rating: B+

Psychotic!

psychotic_posterWe’re far and away from the explosion of homage and throwbacks. In many ways, filmmakers trying their hand at resurrecting the glory days of 70’s and 80’s schlockfests ends up being a transparent attempt to hide budget constraints. Every so often filmmakers can surprise with a surprising love letter to the style that transcends their original intentions. Psychotic! is not the latter. Still, Maxwell Frey and Derek Gibbons have crafted a love letter of sorts–just one that feels like it was sloppily written by a drunk teenager.

I don’t mean for that to sound overly negative. We all have fond memories of our drunk teenage days, but we hardly ever seek out that part of our history for doses of wisdom or taste. Psychotic! is essentially Halloween, if Halloween was about New York hipsters in a constant drug haze. The score is very much Halloween inspired, yet the violence and slasher carries tones of Giallo–the end result is a combo that’s enjoyable yet frustrating.

Hipsters and hipster culture is and will always be annoyingly infuriating and confusing (to someone like me), so Psychotic!’s characters are already set up for failure. Smug self-importance, disregard for normal speech and behavior patterns and irrational criticism run rampant which often are at odds with what a viewer like myself are willing to tolerate. Yet, there are moments of coherence that feel as though they were meant for a different movie entirely. A meta sense of humor and well staged (yet decidedly low-budget) effects are the film’s strong suit.

Pyschotic! is the type of movie that you can–like a true hipster–point at as having knowledge of while everyone else squints in disapproval. Having seen the film isn’t going to make you the superior movie geek to anyone you know, but it’s definitely worth a go if you accidentally stumble on it when browsing the depths of Netflix/Shudder one day.

Rating: C

Winchester

winchester_posterIf there was ever a movie that deserved to be retroactively retitled to JUMP SCARE: THE MOVIE, it’s Winchester. It’s sad to see talents like The Spierig Brothers (who helmed such fantastic films as Predestination and Daybreakers) devolve into directors for hire in studio misfires like Jigsaw and the film currently on the chopping block. Even more, it’s embarrassing to see the great Helen Mirren struggling to make any of this sound intelligent.

Mirren stars as Sarah Winchester, the heiress of the Winchester firearm fortune who is ordered to undergo a psychiatric evaluation when she orders the endless construction of her mansion. Adding on to the mansion isn’t so much the peculiar behavior so much as the design and impetus of the rooms being that they are meant to draw and trap the souls of victims at the hands of the various Winchester rifles that Sarah believes are haunting her looking for peace. However, Dr. Price (Jason Clarke) arrives to conduct his evaluation when a particularly powerful and vengeful spirit has taken residence in the mansion.

The lunacy of this story and the actual physical structure–which is a real place for those who might not be aware–is fascinating in and of itself. Winchester holds promise in that it’s attempting to bring some sort of coherence that translates to the screen, but fails at almost every turn. What left is a mass of wasted potential that takes the easy scare whenever it possibly can instead of squeezing an eerie sense of surrealism from its “fact” based story.

Winchester is a paint by numbers jump-scare-a-thon that doesn’t even bother to be playful by coloring even a fraction outside the lines. The Spierigs wastes its two leads in supremely disappointing fashion while further damaging their once creative promising careers in favor of yet another lazy studio cash grab.

Rating: D+

The Cloverfield Paradox

cloverfield3_posterBad Robot shocked us all by announcing that Cloverfield 4 (currently titled Overlord) wasn’t just part of the Cloverfieldiverse, but was finished filming and could essentially drop at any time. The only issue being that at the time, the fate of Cloverfield 3 (originally titled God Particle then rumored to be called Cloverfield Station) was still up in the air. Then the genre community collectively gasped when a trailer dropped during Super Bowl 52 indicating it was ‘Coming Very Soon’ via Netflix and was now titled The Cloverfield Paradox. Nerds took to their devices, fired up Netflix and gasped once again by the words “Available After the Game”. History was officially made. A film that no one had a clue when it was going to be released was going to be available the same night its marketing premiered.

Critics didn’t screen it beforehand (allegedly) and we would all have the ability to see this thing unfold before the hype machine got rolling. Perhaps though, this was all by design. That studio worries of a film that didn’t meet their expectations lead to multiple delays and the opportunity to manufacture a buzz through a Netflix acquisition and a “Never been done before” marketing technique would drive traffic to a film that quite simply can’t live up the insanity of its release drama.

The Cloverfield Paradox is not inherently a bad movie. However, it is a frustrating experience that borders on annoying. Annoying because it has no business being a Cloverfield movie and its attempt to shoehorn it into that universe are transparent and sloppy. From the horribly written Donal Logue exposition dump that sets the stage for the entire Cloverfield universe in general, to the obvious and eye-rolling jump scare in the closing seconds–the film’s biggest faults are that it has the audacity to carry the name Cloverfield.

God Particle is the perfect name for this movie. It wouldn’t fix some of the sloppy science that’s on display nor would it save it from some of its other flaws, but it would’ve eliminated the retroactive rage that comes with tying it unnecessarily to a franchise its script clearly didn’t originally intend. As a sci-fi thriller The Cloverfield Paradox has a fascinating arc that runs parallel to extra footage shot specifically to throw the Cloverfield references in. The antics on the space station have a gleeful insanity to them as long as you ignore the dime store science it throws at you. It’s all very light and entertaining so long as you try not to peel back too many layers.

Its ties to the Cloverfieldiverse are all bad though. I have an admiration for what they are TRYING to do, but it so clearly could have been done so much better with even just a smidge more planning and execution. Serving to bridge the gap and explain in some ways how the aliens from 10 Cloverfield Lane (sorry, but if you watched Paradox without seeing Lane I don’t feel that bad about spoiling the fact that Lane has aliens) are so different from the monster we see in 2008’s Cloverfield. Also setting the stage for a different set of supernatural surprises that could be in store for us in the upcoming Overlord.

The Cloverfield Paradox while eerily familiar is worse off due to its forced connections. If it helps to ease the transition to explain this universe and its many possibilities then I for one and happy with letting it be an unfortunate blip on an otherwise promising franchise radar that just so happens to be an okay enough sci-fi thriller on its own–which might be the real paradox here.

Rating: C+

[Movie Review] Edgy Advertising Pays Off for ‘Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri’

threebillboards_posterThe world Martin McDonagh creates in his latest flick Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri is one where there are no consequences for the horrible things we do to one another. It’s of course not necessarily a rule as some actions do carry consequences, but not in the traditional sense of how we expect those to be punished for things like–kicking children in their genitals, throwing people out of windows or throwing molotov cocktails at a police station. It’s also the type of world where the characters in spite of all their flaws and curt behavior to one another have an underlying care for one another that’s not uncommon amongst small town folk. It may only come out during some of the more dire situations and stuffed down even under duress, but it’s there and McDonagh encapsulates it brilliantly.

Several months following the brutal rape and murder of Angela Hayes her mother, Mildred (Frances McDormand) is struck suddenly with an outside-the-box idea while driving home along the highway where her daughter’s crime occurred. There, three tattered billboards stand, unused since the 80’s and Mildred wants to use them to send a message to the small town’s chief of police Bill (Woody Harrelson). The message is simple–that she hasn’t forgotten that no killer has been caught and wants answers. The billboards are innoffensive but concise and have an adverse effect on the police’s overall empathy for Mildred even as Bill regrets how the case turned out. They do however get the town stirred up which leads to the towns underlying tensions to manifest in wild and potentially dangerous ways.  (more…)

[Movie Review] You’re Gonna Want to Play ‘Gerald’s Game’

We as horror fans are lucky to have Mike Flanagan. The man is making concepts that have no right work, do so in spectacular fashion. From murderous mirrors, or a killer stalking a deaf victim all the way to making the original Ouija suck a little less–now if only someone would help Before I Wake finally see the light of day. 

Now, we’ve got Gerald’s Game. A movie that, in large part, takes place in a single location. Jessie (Carla Gugino) and her hubby Gerald (Bruce Greenwood) decide to take a trip to their lake house and in an effort to spice if their marriage Gerald handcuffs Jessie to the bed. However, when Gerald’s role playing fantasy goes awry he suffers a heart attack and dies before he can uncuff Jessie. Left in an impossible situation she is forced to confront her traumatic past while searching for any clue that help her escape the cuffs. 

How fitting for the latest Netflix Original to come out in 2017 just a month after we experienced a total solar eclipse. A similar event plays a pivotal role in Jessie’s psychological journey. The tole of emotional wounds coming to a head as she sits on the bed waiting for her death or for help to arrive. As her mind begins to crack she envisions versions of herself and her husband moving freely throughout as part of her internal thought process–both taunting her and trying help her thing logically in her predicament. 

Gerald’s Game unfolds as a dramatic psychological thriller. Part drama about a married couple’s struggles at keeping the romance alive due to hidden desires and other deeper emotional scars and part survival thriller. Gugino crushes both aspects of her character–a woman who’s dodged childhood trauma her hold life and one driven to survive when forced to examine her actions that lead her to being handcuffed to that bed. Greenwood too, compliments Gugino as a force of masculinity with complicated ties to Jessie’s deep seeded troubles. In the end the film also delivers just enough cringeworthy violence and bone chilling sound effects to gratify genre fans looking for the cherry-on-top. 

Like any minimalist thriller the struggle is keeping the audience riveted–Flanagan and co-writer Jeff Howard spin some incredible sequences of psychological barbs between characters. Combined with Flanagan’s visual prowess to stage a scene for maximum creep factor to provide some stiff competition to Pennywise and The Losers Club for best King adaptation of 2017. 

Widely considered one of many unfilmable King novels, Flanagan makes it look like a walk in the park. Gerald’s Game is taught, suspenseful and magnificently performed–but a shame that the vast majority of the populism will only be able to experience it on the small screen. 

Rating: A

Beer Recommendation: None at this time. Sorry, you kinky pervs. 

[Movie Review] mother! Puts the Exclamation Point in WTF!

Movie nerds bristle with excitement at the idea of a new year and a new movie from visionary director, Darren Aronofsky. Blake Swan made so many swoon at the filmmaker’s artistic prowess and delivered a gold statue at the feet of Natalie Portman. Oh, what marvelous treasures must be waiting for us with the allignment of such a bold innovative voice and stars like Jennifer Lawrence and Javier Bardem. The film opens and like a George R.R. Martin like twist the fans and critics alike are lining up to take turns diving a dagger into Aronofsky’s divisive vision.

I never do this, but to truly dig below the surface of mother! I feel it’s important to delve into some context of why people are so split–why some might worship Aronofsky’s artistic expression while others might take their ticket stub and use it as some part of a voodoo ritual that culminates in the director’s untimely demise. Before we venture into those treacherous waters let me say this–mother! is a work of art. An interpretive painting that disgusts you, but strangely you feel compelled to keep starring and marvel at its audacity. Pretentious as that sounds, it’s a cinematic voice that should be encouraged even if it’s not something mainstream audiences have the stomach for. I encourage moviegoers to take the plunge into Aronofsky’s troubling psyche, but be forewarned that when you come out on the other side, remember…it was your choice to actually do so.  (more…)

[Movie Review] IT Redefines the Hollywood Horror Formula

Don’t get swept up in thinking nostalgia is what lends to your percepted fond memories of the original 90’s IT mini-series. It’s pretty bad. Apart from Tim Curry’s always steady and reliable acting chops the mini-series is borderline unwatchable. Luckily, a fondness for the original is not a prerequisite for digging deep into MAMA director, Andy Muschietti’s delightful adaptation.

Not without its own issues (but we’ll get to that) the latest IT pulls from the classic Stephen King novel of the same name in which a handful of bullied youths that make up The Losers Club must band together to fight an ancient evil residing in their quaint town of Derry. Iconically, the evil takes the form of many of the character’s deepest fears, but it’s hands down favorite apprearance is a f***** up clown by the name of Pennywise (Bill Skarsgård). This adaptation finds Pennywise’s design that if a Victorian era clown with fiendishly evil facial expressions, but played interestingly enough by Skarsgård–alternating from over-the-top giggles to a guttural sinister tone that’s as inconsistent as it is unsettling at times.  (more…)

[Movie Review] ‘Dunkirk’ is 2017’s Most Pummeling Onslaught of Cinematic Skill

The sights and sounds of war. That’s what Christopher Nolan’s Dunkirk is all about. Forget character and forget telling individual stories–this movie wants to put the audience on the front lines of land, air and sea to deliver an experience. Make no mistake, Dunkirk is one of the most incredible and unique cinematic experiences you’re likely to experience–and while there are a number of prolific filmmakers, few operate with such technical skill quite like Nolan.

The film tells the story of British forces trapped on the beaches of Dunkirk simultaneously awaiting rescue and intermittent air attacks at the hands of Nazi forces. Nolan’s focus is that of human resolve and wordless heroism. It is true, there are few characters you can attach yourself too, but that’s not the point. Dunkirk is a film you simply live as an audience member. In the grips of war, the British forces are constantly being bombed from the air as they await military boats to take them home–said boats are themselves under attack, so the soldiers are in a harrowing fight for survival. Dunkirk’s entirety pulls the audience from those breathless sequences to show intercutting sequences of a civilian boat headed to the beach to help save soldiers and the air forces en route to pick off the enemy planes attacking the boats.  (more…)