stephen king

[Movie Review] You’re Gonna Want to Play ‘Gerald’s Game’

We as horror fans are lucky to have Mike Flanagan. The man is making concepts that have no right work, do so in spectacular fashion. From murderous mirrors, or a killer stalking a deaf victim all the way to making the original Ouija suck a little less–now if only someone would help Before I Wake finally see the light of day. 

Now, we’ve got Gerald’s Game. A movie that, in large part, takes place in a single location. Jessie (Carla Gugino) and her hubby Gerald (Bruce Greenwood) decide to take a trip to their lake house and in an effort to spice if their marriage Gerald handcuffs Jessie to the bed. However, when Gerald’s role playing fantasy goes awry he suffers a heart attack and dies before he can uncuff Jessie. Left in an impossible situation she is forced to confront her traumatic past while searching for any clue that help her escape the cuffs. 

How fitting for the latest Netflix Original to come out in 2017 just a month after we experienced a total solar eclipse. A similar event plays a pivotal role in Jessie’s psychological journey. The tole of emotional wounds coming to a head as she sits on the bed waiting for her death or for help to arrive. As her mind begins to crack she envisions versions of herself and her husband moving freely throughout as part of her internal thought process–both taunting her and trying help her thing logically in her predicament. 

Gerald’s Game unfolds as a dramatic psychological thriller. Part drama about a married couple’s struggles at keeping the romance alive due to hidden desires and other deeper emotional scars and part survival thriller. Gugino crushes both aspects of her character–a woman who’s dodged childhood trauma her hold life and one driven to survive when forced to examine her actions that lead her to being handcuffed to that bed. Greenwood too, compliments Gugino as a force of masculinity with complicated ties to Jessie’s deep seeded troubles. In the end the film also delivers just enough cringeworthy violence and bone chilling sound effects to gratify genre fans looking for the cherry-on-top. 

Like any minimalist thriller the struggle is keeping the audience riveted–Flanagan and co-writer Jeff Howard spin some incredible sequences of psychological barbs between characters. Combined with Flanagan’s visual prowess to stage a scene for maximum creep factor to provide some stiff competition to Pennywise and The Losers Club for best King adaptation of 2017. 

Widely considered one of many unfilmable King novels, Flanagan makes it look like a walk in the park. Gerald’s Game is taught, suspenseful and magnificently performed–but a shame that the vast majority of the populism will only be able to experience it on the small screen. 

Rating: A

Beer Recommendation: None at this time. Sorry, you kinky pervs. 

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[Opinion] Recasting The Losers Club for IT Chapter Two

One of the strongest aspects of this year’s IT was its youthful cast. So with the closure of Chapter One, one of the biggest questions for fans was, “Who’s gonna play who in the sequel?” As you may or may not know, Pennywise is an ancient evil that emerges for a period of time every 27 years to feed in the children of Derry.

Spoilers follow, so if you’re not wanting to be spoiled about the ending of IT or the surviving characters then you’d best turn away NOW. At the end of IT the Losers are able to successfully defeat Pennywise and force him into his 27 year slumber without feasting on a member of their club. To celebrate, the group makes a blood pact to return to Derry to fight Pennywise should It ever return to wreak havoc on the town again.  (more…)

[Movie Review] IT Redefines the Hollywood Horror Formula

Don’t get swept up in thinking nostalgia is what lends to your percepted fond memories of the original 90’s IT mini-series. It’s pretty bad. Apart from Tim Curry’s always steady and reliable acting chops the mini-series is borderline unwatchable. Luckily, a fondness for the original is not a prerequisite for digging deep into MAMA director, Andy Muschietti’s delightful adaptation.

Not without its own issues (but we’ll get to that) the latest IT pulls from the classic Stephen King novel of the same name in which a handful of bullied youths that make up The Losers Club must band together to fight an ancient evil residing in their quaint town of Derry. Iconically, the evil takes the form of many of the character’s deepest fears, but it’s hands down favorite apprearance is a f***** up clown by the name of Pennywise (Bill Skarsgård). This adaptation finds Pennywise’s design that if a Victorian era clown with fiendishly evil facial expressions, but played interestingly enough by Skarsgård–alternating from over-the-top giggles to a guttural sinister tone that’s as inconsistent as it is unsettling at times.  (more…)

Movie Review: A Good Marriage

agoodmarriage_posterOh boy where to start? I won’t beat around the bush here, A GOOD MARRIAGE is not a movie made for the big screen. In my opinion it’s not even a movie that should be released via the many On Demand platforms. This is essentially a made for TV flick- though one that’s slightly better than most. Stephen King has long been a well respected horror writer and it saddens me that King’s script, though quite good at times, feels so much less consequential than it could be. A GOOD MARRIAGE for all its promise essentially feels like it could have just as easily been a Lifetime movie.

The premise asks the audience to accept quite a bit pretty early one. Bob (Anthony LaPaglia) and Darcy (Joan Allen) are a happily married couple celebrating their 25th anniversary with friends and loved ones. Shortly thereafter When Bob leaves for a business trip Darcy goes in search of batteries for a remote only to find evidence that links her husband to a series of murders by a  serial killer who calls himself Beadie. Darcy is then thrust into a downward spiral fighting her own sanity and wondering how she could have been so blind to her husband’s dark secret for so long.

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